A Kitchen Needs Character!

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Character shines equally bright both indoors and outdoors. Our dear friend Chad Cordwin at Cordwin Tree Service, Inc. had his kitchen cabinets crafted using Heart Cypress Character with a bird’s eye grain. The cypress colors and textures lend this space the warm, inviting glow a kitchen deserves.

River-Recovered Heart Cypress Character is 100% heart, 100% dense growth.  Its swirling grain is a blend of arching, vertical, and feathery patterns in colors varying from warm honey through cinnamon tan to light chocolate.  The “character” of this grade comes from its pecky areas, face checks, and knots of any size. Heart Cypress is naturally tough, resistant to rot damage and termites.

If you need to remove or prune a tree, grind a stump, or assess foliage for storm risks, we highly recommend Cordwin Tree Service, Inc. Visit their website at or give them a call at 352-591-3642.

 

A Closer Look at Sinker Cypress

Paula and Randy from Florida Crotchwood Mobile Sawmill drop by on occasion to saw River-Recovered® heart cypress logs into beautiful slabs that can be handcrafted into gorgeous mantles, tables, shelves, signage, accents and anything else you can imagine.

This video shows our own Joe Collins skillfully crafting a fireplace mantle out of a River-Recovered heart cypress slab.  Take a look:

Often referred to as, “The Wood Eternal”, antique heart cypress (a.k.a. sinker cypress) is one of the few remaining prehistoric species.  Coloring can vary, displaying anything from warm honey to light chocolate tones. Traditional grades (Select, Vertical) can feature a plain sawn feathery, subtle arching swirling grain and, in some cases, vertical pinstripes. Midnight, Pecky, and Character heart cypress each have their own distinguishing characteristics for a more unique look.

Looking to incorporate heart cypress into your upcoming design project? If so, the antique wood specialists at Goodwin can help you determine which grade of heart cypress best suits your upcoming project. Give us a call to learn more today!

Properly Kiln Drying Antique Wood

Rare, antique wood must be handled with great care.  One reason why Goodwin is considered the industry gold standard is our meticulous kiln drying process. There are many reasons for properly kiln drying the wood to a consistent moisture content, including eliminating and preventing mold and bugs. Our founder and company sawyer, George Goodwin, ensures each board is properly kiln dried and precisely milled to the highest standards.  Let’s take a look at our signature kiln drying process.

Prepping the Wood

We examine each River-Recovered® log and reclaimed board or beam to ensure we are preserving the best and most beautiful sections of the wood. Our company sawyer, George Goodwin, carefully saws the wood.  The ends of the boards are then sealed with a wax-based product to prevent cracking and checking.

Air Dry

The sawn wood then needs time to properly air dry. It takes a few weeks for River-Recovered heart pine to achieve its ideal moisture content. River-Recovered heart cypress can take several months due to a higher fiber saturation point.

Pre Dry

After air drying, the wood is then sent to Goodwin’s ‘pre-dryer’, which is comprised of 16 fans (4’ across each) that blow air across the boards in stacks. We allow 1” between each layer to ensure the air circulates around each board.

Dehumidification Dry Kiln

Antique heart pine and heart cypress is very dense. Kiln drying fast with steam causes cracking and checking. Goodwin has invested in a dehumidification dry kiln that dries the wood slowly over the course of several weeks to ensure the ideal moisture content is achieved without affecting its quality.

Monitor Moisture Content

The moisture content of the wood is monitored several times a day. We slowly increase the temperature until 140 degrees is consistently achieved across the entire load. Once the wood comes out of the kiln, we let it relax for a few days before milling it into our signature River-Recovered and reclaimed heart pine and heart cypress.

The following video shows pallets of River-Recovered and reclaimed wood being placed into our dehumidification dry kiln.  Enjoy!

Sinker Cypress, It Never Gets Old

Sinker cypress logs are beautiful and have such a charming mystery about them that seeing these antique River-Recovered® gentle giants never gets old!  Founder, owner and company sawyer, George Goodwin, has worked with sinker cypress for more than four decades.  George is an excellent storyteller and always enjoys educating people about antique wood.

In this video, George shows us several recently recovered sinker cypress logs that are being prepped for milling.  The first log dates back prior to the 1880s.  We know this because of its ax cut ends.  Axes were used to cut wood prior to the 1880s.  After 1880, most logs were cross cut.

George shows us another interesting log that still has part of the wooden pegs that were used to secure it to the raft as it traveled down the Altamaha River in Southeast Georgia.

These logs are naturally bug and rot resistant, making them perfect for exterior siding. They will soon be transformed into Goodwin’s gorgeous River-Recovered Heart Cypress where they will see a second life as beautiful paneling or siding for a home or commercial space.

Want to learn more about how to incorporate Heart Cypress into you living or work space?  If so, give our antique wood experts a call today!

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Adds Character to Cigar City Brewing

You’ve seen the photos of Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Heart Cypress in the Lexus Lounge at Tampa, Florida’s Amalie Arena.  We partnered with our good friend, Beverly Frank of B Frank Studio in Tampa (previously with Gould Evans) for this project.

The Tampa Bay Lightning recently announced a partnership with Cigar City Brewing, naming the Tampa brewery as its official craft brewer. As a result, garage space at Amalie Arena was designated to be remodeled into a retail taproom for Cigar City.

Beverly Frank was again engaged by Amalie Arena to design this exciting new space.  She specified nearly 2000sf of Goodwin’s 2-1/4″ River-Recovered Heart Cypress Character to appoint interior ceilings, walls and the exterior entryway of the brewery.  Take a look:

Historically, old growth bald cypress grew thick in the many sloughs around Tampa Bay and commonly lived to be 1000 years old or more. Heart Cypress Character grade features a rustic, relaxed feel that complements the sleeker finishes in the overall space, creating the perfect environment to enjoy a fresh craft beer.

Heart Cypress Character is 100% heart, 100% dense growth and has subtle, graceful swirling grain with a blend of vertical and feathery patterns.  It can include some pecky areas, face checks, knots of any size and a good bit of color variation from warm honey through cinnamon tan to light chocolate tones.

Bryan Curry of Curry Cabinetry in Tampa was brought back to perform the installation.  He also worked on the Lexus Lounge project.

Photos by Amy Lamb of Native House Photography.

Back to the Beach!

Goodwin’s River-Recovered®, reclaimed and sustainable woods are often specified for coastal projects.  Our wood is perfect for any beachside residence or commercial space.  Take a look at this gorgeous residence in Key West, Florida.  This contemporary, new construction home features Goodwin’s Pecky Cypress on the ceilings and precision engineered Wild Black Cherry flooring throughout:

When it comes to livable luxury, building design professionals incorporate antique and sustainable wood to achieve a fresh yet warm feel. Are you planning to remodel your home in 2020?  If so, give the antique and sustainable wood experts at Goodwin a call today!

Heart Cypress Feature Wall

Heart Cypress Feature Wall

Adds Beauty and “Grace” to Non-Profit Reception Area

Grace Place, a non-profit organization in Naples, Florida that helps children and families, now has a gorgeous River-Recovered® Heart Cypress feature wall in their reception area to recognize their generous donors.  The wood feature wall was crafted using 120 sq.ft of River-Recovered Heart Cypress Select and Vertical with trim.  Dan Petersen of Heritage Wood Finish Company coated it with his signature UV Diamond 7, a proprietary finish he formulated specifically for Goodwin.

Goodwin partnered with David Corban Architects, who were referred to us by our good friend Tenna Florian from Lake/Flato Architects. This is one of the most creative uses of a wood feature wall we have seen.  What a unique and beautiful way for a non-profit organization to recognize and demonstrate how much they value their donors!

Featured Wood: River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Character

Add a Little Character to Your Home or Office in 2018

Have you seen our River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Character feature walls?  They are a hot seller and are absolutely stunning.  In fact, heart cypress character’s unique fine grain, arching grain patterns and vertical pinstripes makes it a popular species for feature walls, paneling, ceilings, trim and anywhere else you want to add subtle beauty.

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress is also a conversation piece, as it is one of only a few remaining prehistoric species available. Character grade offers more natural characteristics and even some unique features such as face checks, cracks and a few loose knots.

Our clients love its colors, which range from warm honey to cinnamon tan and light chocolate tones.  If you want more consistent color, it can be stained. And, with 99.9% heart content, how can you go wrong?

Treat yourself to some River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Character in the upcoming year.  Our friendly experts are here to help!

Trending Wood Feature Walls

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress – Indoor / Outdoor Ceilings and Walls

Antique River-Recovered and reclaimed heart cypress feature walls and interior/exterior wood walls and ceilings are now widely used in contemporary design. S.R. Freeman is using Goodwin’s River-Recovered Heart Cypress on their latest modern home project in California.  The folks at SR Freeman were kind enough to send us some photos of the heart cypress walls and ceilings as they are being installed.  Special thanks for this sneak peek!

Antique Heart Cypress Adds “Character” to Contemporary Office Space

Goodwin Company was proud to supply our River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Character for a reception desk, kitchen and a number of gorgeous feature walls in the ultra-modern office space for Visit Tampa Bay. Located in one of the beautiful skyscrapers that adorn the Tampa, Florida skyline, Visit Tampa Bay is a premier promoter of “the hip, urban heart of the Gulf Coast of Florida.”

Goodwin’s River-Recovered Heart Cypress Character adorns the walls and various areas throughout the office space and is also featured in the Unlock Tampa Bay Visitors Center. The heart cypress paneling gives a nod to the 2000-year-old bald cypress trees that historically lined all of the bayous and sloughs around the bay.  An added touch is the cigar boxes that are embedded in the various walls denoting Tampa’s (and Ybor City’s) rich history as the cigar capital of the world.

Check out these stunning photos by Native House Photography:

Goodwin produced 1600sf of 5-1/4″ River-Recovered Heart Cypress Character for this project.  The wood was prefinished with oil by Heritage Wood Finish Company and installed by AWS Carpenter/ Contractors of Clearwater, Florida.

If you are in the Tampa area, be sure to stop by the Unlock Tampa Bay Visitors Center.  They have some great gifts and mementos of Tampa.  The wonderful staff are also available to direct you to points of interest and help plan your stay. Oh, and while there, be sure to check out the heart cypress feature wall and let us know what you think!

Sunken Treasure—Gold in the Rivers

Gold in the form of rich hues and grain of aged Heart Pine and Heart Cypress has been submerged for hundreds of years in the Suwannee and other Florida Rivers. This year these highly treasured trees will surface, thanks to ecologically aware people like George Goodwin, who petitioned and won the privilege to retrieve them without disturbing the surrounding Eco-systems.

When the trees were initially hewn, it was the oldest and most dense trees that rolled off the logging rafts and slipped into the darkness of the Suwannee. Most of the trees recovered by Goodwin and Company are hundreds and sometimes thousands of years old. The wood colors range from golden honey to a rich burgundy red. The well-defined grains are works of art ranging from select arches to vertical pin stripes to curly or burl grain. The wood is carefully sawn, slowly air-dried, then kiln-dried and meticulously milled to the specifications of the particular project and the customer’s needs. Goodwin follows the 1904 grading rules for Heart Pine and Heart Cypress and sets the standards for antique woods today.

Whether for restoration or for the beauty of the wood being used in modern design, Goodwin’s recovered Heart Pine has starred in PBS’s This Old House and The New Yankee Workshop. It has played a role in HGTV’s Dream Builders and has been a notable in such magazines as Women’s Day, U.S. News and World Report and Fine Homebuilding. Most recently, Goodwin was featured in Southern Living, December, 1999.

1,700 Year Old Cypress Logs Found in the River—New Yankee Workshop films in Micanopy, FL

Goodwin Heart Pine Company, specialists in recovering original growth logs from Southern rivers has pulled a mammoth size cypress tree from a private creek in west Florida. The tree, approximately 1,700 years old and over 100 feet tall when it was cut down by ax a hundred years ago, is 53” in diameter and three times larger than most cypress logs Goodwin recovers. Goodwin pulled a 34-foot section from the river, likely the bottom portion of the tree.

Because the tree was submerged in cool water, the milled lumber will be in pristine condition. The sections will provide enough wood to side or panel an entire house and most likely will be used for historic restoration and preservation projects.

Cypress trees are among the most slowly growing and have been clear-cut, like its sister tree the redwood, to near extinction. IT is one of few remaining prehistoric species. A favorite wood of Frank Lloyd Wright’s, cypress was a difficult wood to cut by hand due to is size and swampy growing conditions. A century ago loggers would chop a ring around the tree or “girdle” the tree in winter or early spring so that moisture would be pulled out as the tree put on leaves. Months later in the wet season when it was easier to get a boat into the swamps, the lumber jacks would return to harvest the tree. This particular tree probably was still too heavy and sank even after being girdled.

“In the 22 years I have been recovering and milling antique logs, this tree is certainly among the largest,” said George Goodwin, owner and operator of Goodwin Heart Pine. “It is extremely rare to find a log of this size either recovered from a river or even growing near a river. Unfortunately, Southern original growth forests of heart pine and cypress were clear-but to extinction a hundred years ago and today even young cypress trees are being cut without the benefit of replanting.”

Since Goodwin began its mill in 1979, it has been the original source of true pre-settlement quality Heart Pine and Heart Cypress. The company rescues logs by hand from southern river bottoms where they have lain for more than a century beneath the cool murky waters. Like the treasured timber, a visit to the mill in rural north Florida is a step back in time. George Goodwin tracked down the most knowledgeable old-timers to teach him the lost art of rendering the quality of timber from these old logs that was last available to your great-grandparents. Goodwin takes pride in being different from other lumber mills. The company’s passion for the wood, its craft and its customers demands it!

Rare Woods Capturing the Attention of America’s Craftspeople and Homeowners

As hardwood interiors enjoy a newfound surge in popularity—in everything from home remodeling to new commercial applications—building professionals and homeowners find themselves combing through catalogs and magazines in search of “the perfect wood.”

For some, the decision is based on color. Others look at grain or for something unusual. Then it is always important to think about durability and strength.

One choice that is earning a second look, and often a first purchase, is a little understood wood that was so in demand during the 1800s and early 1900s that entire forests were clear-cut to virtual extinction. Southern Heart Pine is expected to take an even greater leap in popularity this January, when the well-regarded PBS television show, The New Yankee Workshop, features the wood sand heart pine specialist George Goodwin.

Host Norm Abram, intrigued with the unique method George uses to recover antique woods, took a camera crew on location to film Goodwin and his staff pull heart pine and cypress logs in a Southern Georgia river. The logs were lost from up to 200 years ago when loggers used the waterways to transport their cut timber down-river to the mills.

Goodwin Heart Pine Company, a small specialty lumber company owned by Goodwin in Micanopy, Florida, is one of a handful of companies in the United States that offer this rare wood and the only one to retrieve lost logs from riverbeds.

“Unfortunately, because of the changing ecological balance, the tree has nearly passed into extinction. It is only available in limited quantities either by salvaging timbers form old buildings, cutting down the few trees left, or like we do it … by putting on a wet suit and recovering the lost logs from the bottom of Southern rivers,” said Goodwin.

More than five million viewers will see the process in action Saturday, January 25, when The New Yankee Workshop airs on about 300 Public Broadcasting Stations nationally.

The show opens with the segment about the river recovery excursion and then will go on to show Abram giving step-by-step instructions in making a lidded bench from the wood of a recovered cypress log. The show is aimed at the amateur craftsperson and features a complete woodworking project from scratch.

“Sure it is hard work to recover this wood, but it is surely worth it. These logs, many of them 400 and 500 years old are preserved by the cool water and lack of oxygen so the heavy, dense heart remains in perfect condition, unspoiled by saws and nails.

“Because it is so rare and valuable, I stay involved at every stage. I do not pull every log out, but I do personally saw, dry, and inspect every board we mill. We cannot afford to make a mistake with this wood … it’s too hard to come by,” Goodwin said.

Goodwin predicts the interest in Heart Pine and other rare woods will increase as more craftspeople and homeowners gain more information about the woods. To help the process along, the company has just released a free video that documents the extinction of the Southern heart pine. For more information call Goodwin Heart Pine Company at 1-800-336-3118.